When:
September 12, 2020 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
2020-09-12T13:00:00-05:00
2020-09-12T14:00:00-05:00
Where:
Nature At The Confluence Campus
306 Dickop St
South Beloit, IL 61080
USA
Cost:
Donations Appreciated to Support Restoration Work
Contact:
Therese Oldenburg
815-200-6910

“Protectors of the Corn Moon: How the Rock River Ho-Chunks Hid 1,200 Fugitive Indians & Mired U.S. Troops During the 1832 Black Hawk War”  

  • This is a free program, but registration is required as seating is limited. Please register below.
  • An optional 1/2 hour guided walk after the program will further investigate Ke-Chunk village and their gardens. You’ll also see the new “Ke-Chunk Ciporke” sculpture by Ho-Chunk artist Truman Lowe which honors the Ho-Chunk Native Americans who once lived at the confluence of Turtle Creek and the Rock River.

Please join us for a fascinating talk by Dr. Libby Tronnes that reconsiders the role of the Rock River Ho-Chunk Indians during the Blackhawk War. After over 1,200 members of the Sauk band led by Black Hawk fled into Ho-Chunk lands and were pursued by over 3,000 white troops, the Rock River Ho-Chunk attempted to thwart violence on their soil and avoid the destruction of their corn crop by guiding both U.S. troops and Sauk band Indians. You’ll learn how White Crow and Whirling Thunder, leaders at Ke-Chunk village located at the confluence of  the Rock River and Turtle Creek, played a major part in this crisis.

Derived from Tronnes’ dissertation, this presentation seeks to correct our flawed understandings of the so-called “Black Hawk War” by reconsidering the role of the Rock River Ho-Chunks during that crisis, which began in April 1832 and resulted in Ho-Chunk land loss and removals from Illinois and Wisconsin. 

Presented by Dr. Libby Tronnes, assistant professor of history at Bradley University

This is a program Of Our “Time Traveler Series” which is supported by a grant from the Greater Beloit Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors.

Please Register for This Free Program